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After many decades of yearly combined vaccinations, many "dog experts" are now saying yearly vaccinations may not be needed and are probably harmful to your pet.   Here at TOP DOG, we tend to agree and our personal practice has changed in the past few years...therefore, since our dogs live in the boarding kennel, the kennel accepts the new vaccine protocols. 

          We breed schipperkes and since changing our vaccine protocol and the type of food we feed, we have seen a tremendous improvement in our breeding program. Our litter sizes have increased from 1-2 puppies to 4-6 puppies.  Our girls come in season at 6 months and cycle regularly every 6 months. The schipperkes are much healthier and have never looked better! 

This page is to present some facts on the vaccine controversy so that you may decide for yourself what is best for your pet.   Please, don't change your vaccination schedule without researching the facts, both pro and con. 

 

          The following is taken word for word from Kirk's Current Veterinary Therapy XI (Small Animal Practice), page 205, 1992.
Authors:
Tom R Phillips, DVM, Ph.D.
Associate Member
The Scripps Research Institute
La Jolla California

Ronald D Schultz, Ph.D.
Professor and Chairman
Department of Pathobiological Sciences
School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Wisconsin

Annual Vaccination A practice that was started many years ago and that lacks scientific validity or verification is annual revaccinations. Almost without exception there is no immunologic requirement for annual revaccination. Immunity to viruses persists for years or for the life of the animal. Successful vaccination to most bacterial pathogens produces an immunologic memory that remains for years, allowing an animal to develop a protective anamnestic (secondary) response when exposed to virulent organisms. Only the immune response to toxins requires boosters (eg: tetanus in humans), and no toxin vaccines are currently used for dogs or cats. Furthermore, revaccination with most viral vaccines fails to stimulate an anamnestic (secondary) response as a result of interference by existing antibody (similar to maternal antibody interference). The practice of annual vaccination in our opinion should be considered of questionable efficacy unless it is used as a mechanism to provide an annual physical examination or is required by law (ie: rabies vaccinations in some states).

Read the entire article here:

http://www.shalako.com/vaccine.htm        

What Vets Don't Tell About Vaccines

What Vets don't tell you about vaccines.

by Catherine O'Driscoll 

We don't vaccinate humans every year, so why is it that we are advised to vaccinate our dogs and cats annually? It is well known that a certain number of humans will be damaged by vaccines, but vets claim that only a tiny minority of dogs and cats suffer adverse vaccine reactions. Is this true?  After the death of two young dogs, Catherine O'Driscoll discovered that the risks of vaccination are much higher than anyone cares to admit - the 'tiny minority' is a significant significant number! Today, many vets around the world are questioning the vaccine regime. Some assert that vaccines do more harm than good, and the risks far outweigh the benefits.

 There is solid scientific research to demonstrate that vaccines can be harmful.

vaccines that can cause encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain - encephalitis has many diverse symptoms, usually involving a highly sensitized state such as allergies, skin problems, behavioral problems, convulsions, eating disorders, and more.

vaccines that are mixed with deadly poisons.

vaccines that can cause the diseases they are designed to prevent.

vaccines that shed into the environment, spreading disease.

vaccines that disarm and unbalance the immune system.

vaccines which need and do not need annual usage.

               FROM THE VET MED LIST

"Dear Boarding Kennel Owner: "I would like to make you aware that all 27 veterinary schools in  North America are in the process of changing their protocols for  vaccinating dogs and cats.

"Some of this information will present an ethical & economic challenge to vets, and there will be skeptics. Some organizations have come up with a political compromise suggesting vaccinations every 3 years to appease those who fear loss of income vs those concerned about potential side effects. Politics, traditions, or the doctor's economic well being should not be a factor in medical decisions.

      NEW PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY

"Dogs and cats immune systems mature fully at 6 months.             If a modified live virus vaccine is given after 6 months of age  it produces an immunity which is  good for the life of the pet         (ie: canine distemper, parvo, feline  distemper). If another MLV vaccine is given a year later, the antibodies from the first vaccine neutralize the antigens of the second vaccine and there is little or no effect. The titer is not  "boosted" nor are more memory cells induced.   "Not only are annual boosters for parvo and distemper unnecessary,  they subject the pet to potential risks of allergic reactions and  immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. 

"There is no scientific documentation to back up label claims for annual administration of MLV vaccines. "Puppies receive antibodies through their mothers milk. This natural  protection can last 8-14 weeks. Puppies & kittens should NOT be vaccinated at LESS than 8 weeks. Maternal immunity will neutralize  the vaccine and little protection (0-38%) will be produced.   Vaccination at 6 weeks will, however, delay the timing of the first  highly effective vaccine. Vaccinations given 2 weeks apart suppress  rather than stimulate the immune system. A series of vaccinations  is given starting at 8 weeks and given 3-4 weeks apart up to 16 weeks of age. Another vaccination given sometime after 6 months of  age (usually at 1 year 4 mo) will provide lifetime immunity 

CURRENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DOGS

 Distemper & Parvo.   According to Dr. Schultz, AVMA, 8-15-95, when  a vaccinations series given at 2, 3 & 4 months and again at 1 year with a MLV, puppies and kitten program memory cells that survive  for life, providing lifelong immunity.   "Dr. Carmichael at Cornell and Dr. Schultz have studies showing  immunity against challenge at 2-10 years for canine distemper & 4  years for parvovirus. Studies for longer duration are pending.   "There are no new strains of parvovirus as one mfg. would like to  suggest. Parvovirus vaccination provides cross immunity for all types.    Hepatitis (Adenovirus) is one of the agents known to be a cause of  kennel cough. Only vaccines with CAV-2 should be used as CAV-1  vaccines carry the risk of "hepatitis blue-eye" reactions & kidney  damage.   Bordetella Parainfluenza: Commonly called "Kennel cough",  recommended only for those dogs boarded, groomed, taken to dog shows, or for any reason housed where exposed to a lot of dogs.    The intranasal vaccine provides more complete and more rapid onset of immunity with less chance of reaction. Immunity requires 72 hours and does not protect from every cause of kennel cough.   Immunity is of short duration (4 to 6 months).   RABIES : "There have been no reported cases of rabid dogs or cats in Harris,  Montgomery or Ft. Bend Counties [Texas], there have been rabid skunks and bats so the potential exists.     It is a killed vaccine and must be given every year.

  Lymes disease is a tick borne disease which can cause lameness, kidney failure and heart disease in dogs.  Ticks can also transmit the disease to humans.  "The original Ft. Dodge killed bacteria has proven to be the most effective vaccine.    Lyme disease prevention should emphasize early removal of ticks.   Amitraz collars are more effective than Top Spot, as amitraz paralyzes the tick's mouth parts preventing transmission of disease. 

 

     VACCINATIONS NOT RECOMMENDED

Multiple components in vaccines compete with each other for the immune system and result in lesser immunity for each individual disease as well as increasing the risk of a reaction.  Canine Corona Virus is only a disease of puppies.  It is rare, self limiting (dogs get well in 3 days without treatment).   Cornell & Texas A&M has only diagnosed one case each in the last 7 years. Corona virus does not cause disease in adult dogs.  Leptospirosis vaccine is a common cause of adverse reactions in dogs. Most of the clinical cases of lepto reported in dogs in the US are caused by serovaars (or types) grippotyphosa and  bratsilvia. The vaccines contain different serovaars eanicola  and ictohemorrhagica. Cross protection is not provided and  protection is short lived. Lepto vaccine is immuno-supressive to puppies less than 16 weeks.

 

 LIST OF LINKS ABOUT VACCINES:

      http://www.europa.com/~dshecklr/Vaccinations2.html

www.whole-dog-journal.com

 

LOOK UP ANY KIND OF HEALTH PROBLEM

http://www.vetinfo.com/dogindex.html